• Steve

Zoom Bible Study - Parable of the Wedding Banquet

St. Philip’s Zoom Bible Study

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Welcome! So glad you can join us today to study God’s Word. We are going to discuss Jesus’ parable of the wedding banquet. We’ll read the text from Matthew 22 and then work through some discussion questions (listed after the Scripture). You are very welcome to participate in conversation, raise questions, etc. – or you can listen in, whatever you prefer. Let’s dive in.

The Parable of the Wedding Banquet

Matthew 22


 And again Jesus spoke to them in parables, saying, “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who gave a wedding feast for his son, and sent his servants to call those who were invited to the wedding feast, but they would not come.


Again he sent other servants, saying, ‘Tell those who are invited, “See, I have prepared my dinner, my oxen and my fat calves have been slaughtered, and everything is ready. Come to the wedding feast.”’ But they paid no attention and went off, one to his farm, another to his business, while the rest seized his servants, treated them shamefully, and killed them.


The king was angry, and he sent his troops and destroyed those murderers and burned their city. Then he said to his servants, ‘The wedding feast is ready, but those invited were not worthy. Go therefore to the main roads and invite to the wedding feast as many as you find.’ 10 And those servants went out into the roads and gathered all whom they found, both bad and good. So the wedding hall was filled with guests.


11 “But when the king came in to look at the guests, he saw there a man who had no wedding garment. 12 And he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you get in here without a wedding garment?’ And he was speechless. 13 Then the king said to the attendants, ‘Bind him hand and foot and cast him into the outer darkness. In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ 14 For many are called, but few are chosen.”

Bible Study Guide

Inductive Bible study means ‘drawing out’ the meaning from the text as opposed to ‘reading in’ our own ideas. It’s a way of letting the Bible speak for itself by listening carefully to what it says. Once learned, this method can be done in as little as 5-10 minutes or as long as an hour or more.

Part 1: Pray

We start by asking God’s Spirit – who wrote the Scriptures – to be our Guide in helping us understand the Scriptures.

Part 2: Observation

What does the passage say?

1. If it is a story, identify the characters, plot, setting, and so on. What happens in this scene?

2. If it is a letter or poetry, what are some of the key images, metaphors, or ideas?

3. What are the main concepts and themes in the passage?

4. What is the tone of the speaker or narrator?

5. Do you see any repetitions, contrasts, or causes-and-effects?

6. Are there any promises, commands, exhortations, or questions?

Part 3: Interpretation

What does the passage mean?

1. Imagine the perspective of the characters in the scene and/or the first recipients of this passage. How would they have responded to these words?

2. Develop some questions based on the text. You can ask ‘What is significant?’ about your main observations of the passage.

3. Answer your questions from the text and the context.

4. Try to summarize the passage in one sentence. What is the main point the author is communicating to the audience?

Part 4: Application

How does my life fit into God’s story?

1. What do you see in the passage that leads you to give thanks to God?

2. What in the passage leads you to confess a particular sin or sins?

3. What in the passage leads you to ask God for a need?

4. What are the implications for your community (e.g., family, work, church)?

Part 5: Pray

Ask that God will help you believe, confess, give thanks, and obey in response to your understanding of the passage.