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Zoom Bible Study - Parable of the Ten Virgins

St. Philip’s Zoom Bible Study

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Welcome! So glad you can join us today to study God’s Word. We are going to discuss Jesus’ parable of the ten virgins. We’ll read the text from Matthew 25 and then work through some discussion questions (listed after the Scripture). You are very welcome to participate in conversation, raise questions, etc. – or you can listen in, whatever you prefer. Let’s dive in.

The Parable of the Ten Virgins

Matthew 25:1-13


“Then the kingdom of heaven will be like ten virgins who took their lamps and went to meet the bridegroom. Five of them were foolish, and five were wise. For when the foolish took their lamps, they took no oil with them, but the wise took flasks of oil with their lamps.


As the bridegroom was delayed, they all became drowsy and slept. But at midnight there was a cry, ‘Here is the bridegroom! Come out to meet him.’ Then all those virgins rose and trimmed their lamps.


And the foolish said to the wise, ‘Give us some of your oil, for our lamps are going out.’ But the wise answered, saying, ‘Since there will not be enough for us and for you, go rather to the dealers and buy for yourselves.’ 10 And while they were going to buy, the bridegroom came, and those who were ready went in with him to the marriage feast, and the door was shut.


11 Afterward the other virgins came also, saying, ‘Lord, lord, open to us.’ 12 But he answered, ‘Truly, I say to you, I do not know you.’ 13 Watch therefore, for you know neither the day nor the hour.

Bible Study Guide

Inductive Bible study means ‘drawing out’ the meaning from the text as opposed to ‘reading in’ our own ideas. It’s a way of letting the Bible speak for itself by listening carefully to what it says. Once learned, this method can be done in as little as 5-10 minutes or as long as an hour or more.

Part 1: Pray

We start by asking God’s Spirit – who wrote the Scriptures – to be our Guide in helping us understand the Scriptures.

Part 2: Observation

What does the passage say?

1. If it is a story, identify the characters, plot, setting, and so on. What happens in this scene?

2. If it is a letter or poetry, what are some of the key images, metaphors, or ideas?

3. What are the main concepts and themes in the passage?

4. What is the tone of the speaker or narrator?

5. Do you see any repetitions, contrasts, or causes-and-effects?

6. Are there any promises, commands, exhortations, or questions?

Part 3: Interpretation

What does the passage mean?

1. Imagine the perspective of the characters in the scene and/or the first recipients of this passage. How would they have responded to these words?

2. Develop some questions based on the text. You can ask ‘What is significant?’ about your main observations of the passage.

3. Answer your questions from the text and the context.

4. Try to summarize the passage in one sentence. What is the main point the author is communicating to the audience?

Part 4: Application

How does my life fit into God’s story?

1. What do you see in the passage that leads you to give thanks to God?

2. What in the passage leads you to confess a particular sin or sins?

3. What in the passage leads you to ask God for a need?

4. What are the implications for your community (e.g., family, work, church)?

Part 5: Pray

Ask that God will help you believe, confess, give thanks, and obey in response to your understanding of the passage.